On February 8 I was pleased to make my way to the Kentucky State Capitol to show support for Governor Bevin and his historic signing into law two pro-life bills. Senate Bill 5 prohibits the termination of a pregnancy after 20 weeks of gestation. House Bill 2 requires physicians to offer an ultrasound to women before having an abortion (this is not required, women can opt-out). These are two laws that seem, at least in my child-like thinking, non-controversial for pro-life and pro-choice advocates alike.

I was impressed and thankful for the large turnout of Kentucky Baptists and pro-life Kentuckians; the Capitol rotunda was filled. We all were waiting for Governor Bevin to make his appearance, make a speech, and ceremonially sign the bills into law. I saw a few Kentucky Baptist pastors at the Capitol and it was a terrific day.

One small incident, however, made me uncomfortable. About five minutes before the governor appeared, a female emerged from the second floor and quickly draped a long black banner over the balcony that unfolded three-quarters of the way down to the first floor. The sign said something to the effect of, “these laws hurt women.” The lady was wearing a surgical mask and raised her fist high in the air. It was a typical protest.

I was interested to see how my fellow pro-life citizens, including many Kentucky Baptists, would respond to the protest. I didn’t have to wait long. A very quick and very loud orchestration of boos filled the Capitol rotunda. Shouts of “you’re wrong” rose up from the crowd and one lady near me shouted, “go away, you’re not welcome here.” I couldn’t tell what happened, but the banner eventually fell all the way down to the floor and the lady disappeared.

I really didn’t know what to think. My first thought went to the protester. She was on the second floor and I was in a small hallway on the first floor. I wondered where she went, if anyone spoke to her, and if anyone expressed kindness to her. Then I thought about the booing itself. I wasn’t entirely sure how I should feel about what I just witnessed. I thought about the American democratic process. If, for example, a different governor was signing a different set of legislation into law that advanced the pro-choice agenda, I’m assuming some of us would want to arrive at the Capitol to express a different viewpoint. And my hunch is we would not want to be booed or shouted out of the capitol building. Maybe I’m too naive or too ideological. Maybe I need to understand how the world really works. But I don’t think so.

I think Christ called his followers to, in most cases, do the opposite of what seems normal. To do the opposite of our instinctive human response. Because the normal, expected, instinctive response would be to boo this lady out of the building. But isn’t it difficult to love your enemies while booing them? And is this even our enemy? I certainly do not understand how a Christian can affirm a pro-choice position, but I certainly do not think only pro-life people are Christians.

I believe evangelicals should be actively engaged in the political process. But as soon as our political activism corrupts our personal evangelism, we lose.

Kentucky Baptists and pro-choice Kentuckians won a great victory on February 8. I hope there is more like it to come. But for a moment – a brief moment – the sweet taste of victory turned just a bit sour.